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S2, Ep. 7: Kimberley Nash, The Lady Sportswriter (Returns)

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The Lady Sportswriter, Kimberley Nash, returns to the podcast to discuss Lavar Ball, his recent dustup with Fox Sports 1 (FS1) reporter Kristine Leahy on The Herd with Colin Cowherd, why I found the exchange to be so fascinating (from both sides), and much more. (Run Time: 34 minutes)  (more…)

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Ep. 20: Michael Felder, College Football Video Analyst, Bleacher Report

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Michael Felder is proof that if you want to do something bad enough, all it takes is good, old-fashioned hard work. After his playing days as a walk-on for the University of North Carolina (Chapel Hill), “Mike” knew the regular 9-to-5 wasn’t for him. His passion for the game of football, particularly at the college level, is evident immediately when you talk to him. Hence why, after years of hard work, he’s now a college football video analyst for Bleacher Report. (more…)

Ep. 14: Donna Lopiano, President/CEO, Sports Management Resources

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It’s never been okay to downplay a woman’s athletic ability but somehow we continue to allow just that to happen. For too long, we’ve allowed ourselves to view women’s athletics as a novelty or, even worse, as us (mainly men) doing them a favor. I’ve played or followed sports for over 20 years and I have to admit, one thing that always remained fuzzy to me was the true definition of Title IX. I knew it had something to do with equality, but I wanted to know more about it.

That’s where today’s guest, Donna Lopiano, comes in. (more…)

Ep. 7: Sam Mora, Jr., Quarterback Developer/Coach

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In football, the most important position on and off the field is quarterback. The quarterback sets the tone for the team, and is the guy everyone on the team looks to as the example. Private quarterback development is a field that has taken off the last few years and one of the best in the business is Sam Mora, Jr. He has learned from some of the best coaches in football, and has since branched off to start his own company; working with dozens of the best High School and College players in the country. He’s helped train and develop players such as  Jameis Winston, Bryce Petty, Connor Cook, and Johnny Manziel, just to name a few.
But, most importantly, he’ll tell you he’s a developer of young men. Helping them to realize the key to reaching their goals and full potential is by applying systems and a regimen that emphasizes improvement beyond what’s scheduled. By doing this, he’s also helping to develop a more well-rounded individual through lessons from the sport they love. Something that I feel is just as important as anything a player accomplishes on the playing field.
Today’s podcast explores his role in the development of players at this pivotal position and how he mentors a players transition from High School to College to possibly the NFL (5:00). I ask him what he thinks the difficult part of the transition is from the players perspective (10:00), the economics of hiring a personal coach (17:00), why so many players have a hard time transitioning from college to the NFL (20:00), the perception of the black quarterback (27:00), player safety, and much more.
You can follow Sam Mora on Twitter (@SamMoraJr) and Instagram (@sammorajr or @sammorafootball). If you want to know more about what Sam does, check out his website www.sammorafootball.com.
Subscribe and review/rate the Because of Sports Podcast on iTunes. Have questions or inquiries? email me at bospodcast@gmail.com or follow me on Twitter (@dacubbage) and Instagram (@dacubbage or @bospodcast)

Ep. 2: Rodney Smith, Director of Sports Law, Arizona State University

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Rodney K. Smith, Director of Sports Law for Arizona State University, joined me to discuss a range of topics including NCAA policy changes (5:00), agent counsel for high school recruits (10:00), athletes and social change (20:00), and more.

 

Alabama Crimson Tide Again Show College Football Who Reigns Supreme

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Just like that, it was over.

I respected Notre Dame’s defense as much as anyone in the country had. I didn’t buy into the notion that their strength of schedule was weak. Considering they beat the Rose Bowl champion Stanford Cardinal on the road, Southern California (a preseason number one) in Los Angeles (don’t forget they hung 50+ points on a University of Oregon team many thought should have been in the championship game), Oklahoma in Norman, and Michigan at home.

and the “cupcakes” on their schedule were not South Carolina State, Sam Houston State, or any other Division I-A or I-AA team you would see on a normal college football slate. They were BYU, Michigan State, Purdue and Pittsburgh; none of which can be overlooked by anyone.

The one thing missing with this Notre Dame team, the “it” component if you will, was an offense. That’s why they never received their full due from those who know what they’re talking about, and zero respect from those who have no idea what they’re talking about. That’s why we as sports fans are reading about another BCS title for the University of Alabama and the equally hated SEC.

I didn’t need to watch Lacy rumble for 31 yards on his first three carries to know this game would be over quickly. I figured that would happen when I watched him and backfield mate T.J. Yeldon wear out LSU and Georgia’s defense that featured a flock of first-round draft picks. I didn’t need anyone to tell me Everett Golson would struggle to throw the ball on Alabama, Dee Milliner is one of the best cover corners in the country and Ha’Sean Clinton-Dix is too. That goes without mentioning Notre Dame was a team built to run in a game they needed to establish their passing game.

But this is Southeastern conference football and, more importantly, it was Nick Saban football. No gimmicks, nonsense, and all power. You think the Tide yelling at teammates in the late quarters or taking shots down the field with a 35-7 lead was just for show? I’m here to tell you it wasn’t. They came to play football until the clock struck zero, and even then they had to shake the scowl off Saban’s face.

If you enjoy a particular brand of football (high scoring, fast pace, trick plays, etc.) I have no problem with that and neither does anyone else. it works for some people and in some places.

But it doesn’t win championships in college football.

That last sentence isn’t debatable, it has been proven every year for the past seven years. If you think its unfair, you might want to reconsider the brand of football you enjoy because one-dimensional teams are no longer an option. I’m not an Alabama fan, and this, as I said earlier, isn’t even about the SEC anymore. Alabama has broken down the fraction of this equation that used to equal SEC dominance. The remainder is Alabama, and the rest of the country is now looking for a solution. Brian Kelly after the game put it best:

“After the game, Kelly gave credit to Alabama, and seemed almost to treat the trouncing they’d just received as a lesson—a field trip, so to speak—to the big leagues. “Our guys needed to see what it looked like” to play a championship team, he said in the postgame presser. There was very little post-game analysis of what he or his players could have done differently; rather, there was a focus on the future, now that they’d seen the best. “We all now know what we need to do” to play like a team that wins championships, Kelly said, calling it a “great, great opportunity.” In other words, he seemed to be saying, I realized pretty quickly we were never really in it, so let’s at least try to learn something from it.” (SOURCE:  Jena McGregor, Washington Post)

At this point its time to recognize the Crimson Tide for what they are in college football. Like Duke and UCLA basketball, the Lakers and Celtics in the NBA, and others in various sports before them Alabama has become that dynasty that everyone loves to hate.

Even if they have no legitimate reason to.

Locker Talk Episode 17!

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The Lady SportsWriter Kim Nash joined me Monday to talk about the BCS National Championship game between the University of Alabama and Notre Dame University. We also discussed Aaron Murray’s decision to come back as quarterback of the Georgia Bulldogs and who raised their draft stock this bowl season. Locker Talk airs twice a week (Thursday 1 pm EST and Friday 2 pm EST) on BlogTalkRadio.com

 

Locker Talk 01/07 by Locker Talk | Blog Talk Radio

Locker Talk Episode Eight : College Football Thursday! (11/1/2012)

The Lady Sportswriter Kim Nash joined me on Thursday for our weekly discussion about all things College Football. Take a listen as we reviewed the biggest match-ups this weekend, BCS possibilities, last weekends ramifications on the title picture, and if Aaron Murray really is the ONLY option worth considering at Georgia? Join us every Thursday at 1 pm and call in at (773) 897-6129.

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/thelocker/2012/11/01/locker-talk-college-football-thursday